2010 Senate Money Race: Who Can We Send To the Deadpool?

moneygraphThe Tolbert Report is rounding up some of the financial reports from various Arkansas candidates for U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate, so to supplement Jason’s efforts I’ve created this handy graph of the financial performance of several of the Senate candidates.

So who will survive for another quarter, and which of these walking wounded campaigns should we be shuffling off to the deadpool? Here’s what this graph tells us:

  • If you’re over on the left side of the graph, your fundraising efforts are showing some vigor, and you should keep doing what you’re doing!
  • If you’re grouped in the middle of the pack there (and/or heavily dependent upon personal loans to your own campaign), ehhhh, I don’t know, man, you either need to step it up or start planning a graceful exit. Y’know, like maybe a quiet departure from the race around the holidays, when no one’s really paying that much attention. The first person to proclaim that “This campaign is about the message, not the money” will automatically be shifted to the deadpool. Trust me, because I’ve tried that and it doesn’t work.
  • If you’re one of those guys over there on the far right side of the graph, please note that I have so little confidence in your chances that I haven’t even bothered to find your photo to cut your head out. I can’t even muster the energy to make funny pictures of you. Think about that for a little bit.

Here’s the full list of announced/considering/rumored Senate candidates for 2010. I look forward to making it shorter soon, so let’s get moving on some of those aforementioned graceful exits.

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5 thoughts on “2010 Senate Money Race: Who Can We Send To the Deadpool?

  • October 16, 2009 at 11:04 pm
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    Don’t count off the people at the bottom of the graph. They could still come out on top. Fred Ramey is an everyday person running for office and we need more people like him, not someone already in politics. And he also cannot use his own money to run, which makes him closer to the voters, and means he owes us his win. You may say that some of the candidates are in the “deadpool” but politics is not always cut and dry. The frontrunner does not always stay that way, need I remind you that neither Pres. Obama nor Senator McCain was the frontrunner at the beginning of their races, but both went on to be their parties nominee.

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  • October 19, 2009 at 11:24 pm
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    Fred Ramey seems like a great guy. Has he thought about starting somewhere besides the top? I don’t mean that to be snide in the least, but isn’t there another race he could cut his teeth on? Ditto, virtually everyone else.

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  • October 20, 2009 at 4:57 pm
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    Carol is right. Why do all these people want to start at the “top”? Why not consider a constitutional office, or state house or senate? Or, even Mayor of their local town/city?

    Republicans seem to not want to put in time in the political trenches and work their way up. We have several good candidates here who will ultimately lose this race. They could actually compete in or win others. You build a party from the ground up–not the top down.

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  • October 21, 2009 at 9:38 am
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    If you don’t update with a new post soon I’m afraid I’m going to have to ask for a refund.

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  • December 6, 2009 at 1:41 am
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    The Money is the problem. The Incumbent whether Democrat or Republican will get the PAC and special interest money almost equally from the same entity. That is the game. The people should consider a high pricetag for a candidate as just that. It is what the special interests are paying for.
    for a full detailed video explaining this concept look up the Independence Caucus. Some easy to follow tell all info there.

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